0

Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly

Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly

A slow-draining sink with a garbage disposal means that there are two parts to this problem: the garbage disposal itself and the sink pipe that is connected to it. One or the other can become plugged of its own accord, or both can get plugged at the exact same time. Fixing a slow-draining sink first begins by troubleshooting the garbage disposal. If the garbage disposal is in working condition, the connecting pipe needs to be attended to.
[imgrabber img=”Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly 1″]

Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly

Unclog a sink Unclogging a Sink:2. Feed the flexible cable directly into the drainpipe. Turn the crank clockwise to advance the cable and cut through the clog. Most minor sink clogs can be cleared with a plunger. Partially fill the sink with water, then start plunging. Vigorously work the plunger up and down several times before quickly pulling it off the drain opening. If it’s a double-bowl kitchen sink, stuff a wet rag into one drain opening while you plunge the other one. If it’s a bath sink, stuff the rag into the overflow hole. In both cases, the rag helps deliver the pressure directly to the clog. If plunging doesn’t work, grab the cable auger and go to work under the sink. Remove the sink trap with a pipe wrench. The large, threaded coupling on PVC plastic traps can often be unscrewed by hand. Empty the water from the trap into a bucket (photo 1, above), then make sure the trap isn’t clogged. Remove the horizontal trap arm that protrudes from the stubout in the wall. Feed the cable into the stubout until you feel resistance. Pull out 18 in. of cable, then tighten the lock screw. Crank the handle in a clockwise direction and push forward at the same time to drive the cable farther into the pipe (photo 2). Pull out another 18 in. of cable and repeat the process until you break through the blockage. If the cable bogs down or catches on something, turn the crank counterclockwise and pull back on the auger. Once the cable is clear, crank and push forward again. Retrieve the cable and replace the trap arm and trap. Turn on the hot-water faucet to see if the sink drains properly. If it doesn’t, don’t worry. Debris from the busted-up clog sometimes settles into a loose blockage. Partially fill the sink with hot water and use the plunger to clear the debris. Follow up with more hot water.
[imgrabber img=”Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly 2″]

Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly

Most minor sink clogs can be cleared with a plunger. Partially fill the sink with water, then start plunging. Vigorously work the plunger up and down several times before quickly pulling it off the drain opening. If it’s a double-bowl kitchen sink, stuff a wet rag into one drain opening while you plunge the other one. If it’s a bath sink, stuff the rag into the overflow hole. In both cases, the rag helps deliver the pressure directly to the clog. If plunging doesn’t work, grab the cable auger and go to work under the sink. Remove the sink trap with a pipe wrench. The large, threaded coupling on PVC plastic traps can often be unscrewed by hand. Empty the water from the trap into a bucket (photo 1, above), then make sure the trap isn’t clogged. Remove the horizontal trap arm that protrudes from the stubout in the wall. Feed the cable into the stubout until you feel resistance. Pull out 18 in. of cable, then tighten the lock screw. Crank the handle in a clockwise direction and push forward at the same time to drive the cable farther into the pipe (photo 2). Pull out another 18 in. of cable and repeat the process until you break through the blockage. If the cable bogs down or catches on something, turn the crank counterclockwise and pull back on the auger. Once the cable is clear, crank and push forward again. Retrieve the cable and replace the trap arm and trap. Turn on the hot-water faucet to see if the sink drains properly. If it doesn’t, don’t worry. Debris from the busted-up clog sometimes settles into a loose blockage. Partially fill the sink with hot water and use the plunger to clear the debris. Follow up with more hot water.
[imgrabber img=”Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly 3″]

It’s rare for a bathtub to suddenly become stopped up. A clog in the tub usually builds up over a period of several weeks, with the tub draining more and more slowly each day. We’ve all seen this happen. As with a sink clog, start with the plunger. First, unscrew the screen from the tub drain and use a bent wire to fish out any hair and soap scum. If there’s a pop-up drain on the tub, raise the lever to the open position, then grab the stopper and pull it from the drain hole. Clean it of all hair and soap. This will often take care of things. If not, cover the holes on the underside of the overflow plate with a wet rag and start plunging (photo 3, above). If that doesn’t clear the clog, use the cable auger. Remove the overflow plate from the end of the tub; the stopper linkage will come out with it. Feed about 30 in. of cable down the overflow tube. Push forward while turning the hand crank (photo 4). You’ll feel resistance almost immediately, but keep cranking on the auger until the cable passes all the way through the P-trap that lies underneath the tub. Retrieve the cable, then run several gallons of hot water down the drain. Finally, replace the overflow plate and screen or pop-up drain.
[imgrabber img=”Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly 4″]

4 × Snake a tub drain Snake a tub drain Snaking a Tub Drain:1. Hold a wet rag over the drain holes in the overflow plate to prevent the pressure built up by plunging from escaping. It’s rare for a bathtub to suddenly become stopped up. A clog in the tub usually builds up over a period of several weeks, with the tub draining more and more slowly each day. We’ve all seen this happen. As with a sink clog, start with the plunger. First, unscrew the screen from the tub drain and use a bent wire to fish out any hair and soap scum. If there’s a pop-up drain on the tub, raise the lever to the open position, then grab the stopper and pull it from the drain hole. Clean it of all hair and soap. This will often take care of things. If not, cover the holes on the underside of the overflow plate with a wet rag and start plunging (photo 3, above). If that doesn’t clear the clog, use the cable auger. Remove the overflow plate from the end of the tub; the stopper linkage will come out with it. Feed about 30 in. of cable down the overflow tube. Push forward while turning the hand crank (photo 4). You’ll feel resistance almost immediately, but keep cranking on the auger until the cable passes all the way through the P-trap that lies underneath the tub. Retrieve the cable, then run several gallons of hot water down the drain. Finally, replace the overflow plate and screen or pop-up drain.
[imgrabber img=”Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly 5″]

Snake a tub drain Snaking a Tub Drain:1. Hold a wet rag over the drain holes in the overflow plate to prevent the pressure built up by plunging from escaping. It’s rare for a bathtub to suddenly become stopped up. A clog in the tub usually builds up over a period of several weeks, with the tub draining more and more slowly each day. We’ve all seen this happen. As with a sink clog, start with the plunger. First, unscrew the screen from the tub drain and use a bent wire to fish out any hair and soap scum. If there’s a pop-up drain on the tub, raise the lever to the open position, then grab the stopper and pull it from the drain hole. Clean it of all hair and soap. This will often take care of things. If not, cover the holes on the underside of the overflow plate with a wet rag and start plunging (photo 3, above). If that doesn’t clear the clog, use the cable auger. Remove the overflow plate from the end of the tub; the stopper linkage will come out with it. Feed about 30 in. of cable down the overflow tube. Push forward while turning the hand crank (photo 4). You’ll feel resistance almost immediately, but keep cranking on the auger until the cable passes all the way through the P-trap that lies underneath the tub. Retrieve the cable, then run several gallons of hot water down the drain. Finally, replace the overflow plate and screen or pop-up drain.
[imgrabber img=”Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly 6″]

Search Add New Question A plummer came over and put a cable auger in there, but he said that it needs a longer one. What else can be done? wikiHow Contributor Cable augers can be very long. I have one that I bought at Walmart for less than $20. It’s about 25 feet long and comes in a reel that can be attached to a power drill. Any reputable plumber would have a long auger somewhere, even if he/she didn’t have it in the truck. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 16 Helpful 36 Which kind of vinegar should I use? wikiHow Contributor I recommend just plain white vinegar. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 1 Helpful 6 What can I use if my sink is clogged with candle wax? wikiHow Contributor Try the last approach covered in the article. If you still have trouble, you may need to call a professional. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 4 Helpful 12 Will this work for my clogged bathroom sink? wikiHow Contributor I used the baking soda, vinegar and hot water method (Method 2) on my bathroom sink which has seemingly fixed my issue. However, I have had plumbers tell me to never use a plunger on a bathroom sink (Method 1). Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 7 Helpful 14 Why does my kitchen drain make a loud sound after being used? wikiHow Contributor It is most likely clogged due to another appliance. Thanks! Yes No Not Helpful 12 Helpful 17

You can download all 6 of Kitchen Sink Draining Slowly photo to your device by right clicking photo and then save image as. Do not forget to share if you like with this photo.