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Barefoot In The Kitchen

Barefoot In The Kitchen

Tracing the changing image of women through Spanish cinema post-1930 is a nice idea, but Diego Galan’s “Barefoot in the Kitchen” loosely organizes clips from 180 movies without going into any depth. Offering only the most superficial glimpse at trends while relying on nostalgia-drenched cinephilic memory to gloss over its massive gaps in history and analysis, the docu will appeal only to train-spotter types looking for favorite scenes perfunctorily placed into a chronology rather than an educational structure. More was expected from respected critic Galan; Spanish TV will be the sole taker.SEE MORE: Cannes Film Festival Carlos Hipolito, as narrator, sketchily guides viewers across the decades, beginning in the early 1930s and the Second Republic, when films featuring fallen women alternated with perky, wholesome optimists — very much like pre-Code pics in the U.S. With the Spanish Civil War came a slew of patriotic themes that led to a return to traditional roles under the Franco regime, when marriage was enshrined as the ultimate goal for womankind. By the 1970s a more permissive attitude took hold, uneasily sharing screentime with movies depicting violence against women. With the restoration of the constitutional monarchy came more empowered femme protags along with the strength of Pedro Almodovar’s heroines (the helmer’s brother Agustin is one of the docu’s producers). Galan fails to put Spain in a more international context, just as he neglects the nuances of representation and the influence of the Catholic Church. Films that bucked trends are ignored, history is telescoped, and directors aren’t mentioned apart from Almodovar. The clips themselves are often enjoyable — who wouldn’t want to watch Maria Felix in “Mare Nostrum,” or Marisa Paredes in “All About My Mother”? — yet no one will come away from “Barefoot” feeling any the wiser, and often it seems as if certain scenes were included as mere camp diversions, to be laughed at for their “dated” social mores. Print quality varies among the excerpts, each film identified via cheap graphics with title and date only. The Spanish-lingo title, translated as “with a broken leg,” comes from a sexist saying opining that a good, honest woman is best kept in the confines of her home — an even nastier expression than “barefoot in the kitchen.”
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Barefoot In The Kitchen

The phrase “barefoot and pregnant” seems to have been introduced in the early twentieth century by Arthur E. Hertzler, the Horse-and-Buggy Doctor’ from Kansas: “‘The only way to keep a woman happy,’ he said, ‘is to keep her barefoot and pregnant.'” By mid-century, the phrase had passed into common parlance, so that an article from 1949 states, “By early 1949, TWA was—in the words of its new president, Ralph S. Damon—both ‘barefoot and pregnant.'”
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Barefoot In The Kitchen

Feminists often cite the phrase in a negative, socially critical context. Author Shinine Antony wrote a 2002 collection of short stories entitled Barefoot and Pregnant, explaining in a later interview that, “Barefoot And Pregnant is a phrase that pokes fun at chauvinists who want their women barefoot (so that they are unable to socialize) and pregnant (helpless). This follows the general image of society in which women are merely objects.”
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Barefoot In The Kitchen

The variation “barefoot and pregnant in the kitchen” has been associated with the phrase “Kinder, Küche, Kirche” (translated “children, kitchen, church”), used under the German Empire to describe a woman’s role in society. A comparable phrase, “Good Wife, Wise Mother”, emerged in the 1870s in Meiji Japan, and was used as a means of restricting female access to the public realm there, before spreading more widely in East Asian culture.
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Tracing the changing image of women through Spanish cinema post-1930 is a nice idea, but Diego Galan’s “Barefoot in the Kitchen” loosely organizes clips from 180 movies without going into any depth. Offering only the most superficial glimpse at trends while relying on nostalgia-drenched cinephilic memory to gloss over its massive gaps in history and analysis, the docu will appeal only to train-spotter types looking for favorite scenes perfunctorily placed into a chronology rather than an educational structure. More was expected from respected critic Galan; Spanish TV will be the sole taker.
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Print quality varies among the excerpts, each film identified via cheap graphics with title and date only. The Spanish-lingo title, translated as “with a broken leg,” comes from a sexist saying opining that a good, honest woman is best kept in the confines of her home — an even nastier expression than “barefoot in the kitchen.”
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“Wah Wah 45 have just released an interesting album by Bev Lee Harling, not strickly speaking something that fits easy into eclectic jazz but worth of a mention none the less. ‘Barefoot In Your Kitchen’ quirky electronics, folk melodies and cheeky 50s kitsch combine to make an enchanting whimsical journey led by Harling’s deceptively innocent and quaint vocals.” Phil Levene, Eclecticjazz.com (UK)

Presented in one of our beautiful digi-packs with gorgeous artwork, this is the perfect accompaniment to your listening if you prefer to have something to hold in your mitts. Includes unlimited streaming of Barefoot In Your Kitchen via the free Bandcamp app, plus high-quality download in MP3, FLAC and more.
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Galan fails to put Spain in a more international context, just as he neglects the nuances of representation and the influence of the Catholic Church. Films that bucked trends are ignored, history is telescoped, and directors aren’t mentioned apart from Almodovar. The clips themselves are often enjoyable — who wouldn’t want to watch Maria Felix in “Mare Nostrum,” or Marisa Paredes in “All About My Mother”? — yet no one will come away from “Barefoot” feeling any the wiser, and often it seems as if certain scenes were included as mere camp diversions, to be laughed at for their “dated” social mores.
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Tuesday, April 25, 2017 weights + scriptures When Mike brought home a humongous weight bench (that takes up almost our entire Arizona room and can be seen from the front door!) a few years ago, I thought he was nuts. But now it’s part of my favorite morning routine. Two mornings a week, in between the time that I send my big kids and my little kids to school, I lift weights and read my scriptures. Mike and I use the StrongLifts 5×5 app. I love that it is simple (just five sets of five reps for three exercises). The app keeps track of how much weight I am supposed to lift and counts down my rest time in between sets. I love that I don’t have to think about it, and in between my sets, I can step into the kitchen and think about my scriptures instead. Combining my scripture study with my weight training gives me time to focus and think about what I am reading. It forces me to slow down. I feel like I get more out of my reading, and lifting weights (something I thought I would hate) makes me feel stronger, have better posture, and feel more confident. I look forward to these mornings almost more than any others. posted by stephanie at 8:45 AM 0 comments Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest links to this post
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weights + scriptures When Mike brought home a humongous weight bench (that takes up almost our entire Arizona room and can be seen from the front door!) a few years ago, I thought he was nuts. But now it’s part of my favorite morning routine. Two mornings a week, in between the time that I send my big kids and my little kids to school, I lift weights and read my scriptures. Mike and I use the StrongLifts 5×5 app. I love that it is simple (just five sets of five reps for three exercises). The app keeps track of how much weight I am supposed to lift and counts down my rest time in between sets. I love that I don’t have to think about it, and in between my sets, I can step into the kitchen and think about my scriptures instead. Combining my scripture study with my weight training gives me time to focus and think about what I am reading. It forces me to slow down. I feel like I get more out of my reading, and lifting weights (something I thought I would hate) makes me feel stronger, have better posture, and feel more confident. I look forward to these mornings almost more than any others. posted by stephanie at 8:45 AM 0 comments Email ThisBlogThis!Share to TwitterShare to FacebookShare to Pinterest links to this post
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When Mike brought home a humongous weight bench (that takes up almost our entire Arizona room and can be seen from the front door!) a few years ago, I thought he was nuts. But now it’s part of my favorite morning routine. Two mornings a week, in between the time that I send my big kids and my little kids to school, I lift weights and read my scriptures. Mike and I use the StrongLifts 5×5 app. I love that it is simple (just five sets of five reps for three exercises). The app keeps track of how much weight I am supposed to lift and counts down my rest time in between sets. I love that I don’t have to think about it, and in between my sets, I can step into the kitchen and think about my scriptures instead. Combining my scripture study with my weight training gives me time to focus and think about what I am reading. It forces me to slow down. I feel like I get more out of my reading, and lifting weights (something I thought I would hate) makes me feel stronger, have better posture, and feel more confident. I look forward to these mornings almost more than any others.

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